Strength and Performance

The dictionary defines sport as an athletic activity requiring skill or physical prowess and often of a competitive nature. With that being said, sport isn’t confined to what we see in the Olympics or on ESPN. Over the past few years, through the evolution of the industry, fitness is now considered a sport. There are many times in which even life itself mimics a sport.

But sport isn’t just about athletics and skill development; it also involves competition. You don’t have to be a professional athlete to know the discipline and hard work it takes to prepare for competition. Athletes compete in milestone events at the regional, divisional, national, and world-wide level. This is not so different from the events that your members and clients (maybe even yourself) compete in each year.

From the office “biggest loser” competitions, to the “weekend warrior” softball tournaments, to the 5K, 10K, and half-marathon runners; you can always find someone in your gym working toward some kind of competition, be it with themselves or against others.

But what kinds of skills do athletes need to be successful? Strength and performance training is a broad scope, but it develops the core skill set needed to compete. Let’s take a closer look at what it takes compete at the next level – in sports and in life.

Power

According to the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA), “power is loosely defined as ‘force, energy, strength, and might’. However, in physics, power is precisely defined as ‘the time rate of doing work’ ”, represented by the equation: Power = Work/Time.1 In other words, power is measured by how much force a person can produce over a period of time.

Agility

An agile person has the ability to change direction of their body rapidly under control.1 Agility requires a high level of muscular coordination and neuromuscular efficiency to make the necessary adjustments to change direction at high speeds. Speaking of…

Speed

How fast can you go? Or what is your distance/time? Some people think that speed is something is a skill they are born with. While we can’t change the length of our legs which is the limiting factor of our stride length, there are still ways that we can improve our sprint and running speeds.1

Endurance

Measured by the amount of time one can perform at a medium to high intensity level. Most endurance training involves alternating periods of work and rest as in interval training (HIIT). Traditional circuit training involves a work to rest ratio of 1:1 or more and has been shown to moderately increase both strength and aerobic endurance.1

And the final question – does your facility have the right tools to maximize these skills? Athletes, weekend warriors, and beginners can all benefit from these products under the proper supervision and guidance of a fitness professional.

 

Power

Pro Power Bar 1500

Pro Power Bar – 1500

  • 1,500 lbs weight capacity to support a variety of lifts, including large 1 rep max (1RM) lifts
  • Top quality thrust bearings for smooth spin and durability during quick lifts such as the clean and press, snatch, and power clean

Texas Power Bar

  • Carries a 1,500 lbs weight capacity and an aggressive center knurling for safe grip
  • Provides minimum rotation for power lifts such as squats and deadlifts

 

 

Agility

Reaction Belt

 

Reaction Belt

  • Partner training belt designed to improve reaction time & quickness
  • Two nylon belts connected by Velcro at the center attachment
  • Train to outmaneuver your opponent and force the nylon tails to separate

 

 

 

 

Pro Agility

 

Pro Agility Pole Set

  • Poles require users to maintain an upright and athletic position while traveling
  • Train to make quick, deliberate cuts while being in position to make a play
  • Easy transport for indoor and outdoor use made possible by carry bag

 

 

 

 

Speed

Power chutePower Chute

  • Resistance and overspeed training during the same run
  • Use to train speed, explosiveness, and acceleration
  • Improve stride length and frequency with three choices of resistance (S, M, or L)

 

 

 

 

Leg Speed Builder

 

 

Leg Speed Builder

  • Train specific running muscles using this device the develops the legs, glutes, and hips
  • Work one or two legs at a time
  • Apply resistance by attaching to a secure, fixed object or have a partner assist

 

 

 

Endurance

Infinity Vest

 

Infinity Vest

  • Train for endurance at a slightly heavier weight (6 or 10 additional lbs.)
  • Form fitting profile is a great addition to the body weight training of a circuit such as push-ups, jumping, etc.

 

 

 

 

VersaFit Vest

 

 

Versa Fit Vest

  • Available in three sizes to add up to 40 lbs in 1-2 lbs increments to user weight
  • Use to develop endurance while training for strength and power with body weight exercises and agility drills

 

 

 

 

If you like these Strength & Performance products, wait till you see what’s coming! If you are in the neighborhood, stop by our booth at IHRSA 2016 in Orlando to see our latest additions to this category. If you can’t make it to Orlando, not to worry – sign up for our IHRSA Newsletter to receive updates as products are revealed at the show.

 


1 – National Strength and Conditioning Association. Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning. Edited by Thomas R Baechle, EdD, CSCS. Human Kinetics: Champaign, IL; 1994
Elisabeth Fouts

About Elisabeth Fouts

Elisabeth Fouts is Power Systems’ Education and Trade Show Coordinator and a 10 year veteran in the fitness industry. She has a Bachelor’s Degree in Exercise Science, is certified in and actively teaches 4 Les Mills Group Fitness Programs, and serves as a PowerWave Senior Coach. When Elisabeth isn’t teaching group x classes, you can find her training for or participating in an Obstacle Course race or watching Tennessee Volunteers or Dallas Cowboys football… GO VOLS!